Articles: Volume 8 Issue 4 Jul/Aug 2017

Editorial: The case for cutting back on red meat

There is increasing evidence that the high consumption of red meat is associated with numerous health complication such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Eating prime steak may be the ‘macho male’ thing to do, but choosing a vegetarian option or some line-caught fish might be better, not only for human health, but for the health of the planet.

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Suicide in men: what is the problem?

In high-income countries such as the UK, suicide incidence in males is three times higher than in females. Among men, the suicide rate is higher still for those who are in their middle years (35–54) and live in socio-economically disadvantaged circumstances. Stephen Platt draws on insights from a range of social science perspectives to identify the non-psychiatric factors that interact with psychiatric vulnerability to elevate suicide risk in this demographic group

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25 years post-Calman: the state of men’s health in the UK

25 years have passed since the then Chief Medical Officer, Sir Kenneth Calman, included men’s health as a ‘special topic’ in his annual public health report. Peter Baker reflects on what has been achieved in the men’s health field during this time and what issues remain in need of attention

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Managing overactive bladder in primary care

As the understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the overactive bladder have increased, so its diagnosis and management have become more complex. This article, based on a consensus group meeting, provides guidance on the current management of overactive bladder in primary care

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Testicular cancer: an overview of contemporary practice

Testicular cancer is a common cancer in younger men. It can be successfully treated with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but early diagnosis is key. In this article, the authors describe the diagnosis, pathology and management of the disease

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Managing patients with metastatic prostate cancer: who takes the lead?

The increased number of treatment options for prostate cancer has raised questions over who should be taking responsibility for initiating and ongoing management of patients. In this article the authors report on the findings of a survey seeking the views of UK oncologists and urologists on where they think responsibilities lie

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Management of adrenal incidentalomas

The return of a scan result with reference to an incidental finding of an adrenal mass is a common scenario. The scan was performed for another indication and the clinician is now faced with an unexpected problem. Here, we present some background to the problem, an overview of adrenal disease, and a suggested approach to the ‘adrenal incidentaloma’

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