Positive results for new scan in prostate cancer

Defining the extent of prostate cancer spread in newly diagnosed patients is important for therapeutic decision making. A recent study showed that a new technique, called gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET-CT, had significant benefits over conventional imaging with CT and bone scanning.
In the study, …

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Blood test detects over 50 cancers

A blood test can identify more than 50 types of cancer even at very early stages, according a study published in  Annals of Oncology.
The study used blood samples from over 6000 people, including 2482 with cancers of the anus, bladder, colon/rectum, oesophagus, head and neck, …

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Do drugs discourage lifestyle efforts?

Prescribing statins and antihypertensives may lead to patients putting on weight and doing less physical exercise, according to a recent study.
The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, compared changes in BMI, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and smoking between 8837 Finnish men …

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Men at greater risk of COVID-19

More than 70% of early COVID-19 patients who have been admitted to intensive care units in the UK are men, according to the first report from the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre.
The analysis is of 196 patients receiving critical hospital treatment after testing …

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PrEP to be ‘routinely available’

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) will be made ‘routinely available’ to people at risk of contracting HIV from April. NHS England has announced it will cover the costs of the drug, having carried out a three-year study involving more than 20 000 people.
PrEP is already available in …

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Post-SSRI sexual dysfunction not widely recognised

Sexual dysfunction following use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is under-recognised and can be debilitating both psychologically and physically, says a sexologist writing in the BMJ.
Sexual difficulties after treatment with SSRIs were first reported to regulators in 1991, but it was only in 2006 …

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Mumps on the rise

Recent figures from Public Health England (PHE) show a sharp rise in cases of mumps. There were 5042 laboratory confirmed cases of mumps in England in 2019, compared with 1066 cases in 2018.
Students and young people who may have missed out on their measles, mumps, …

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Male smoking falling at last

For the first time, the World Health Organization (WHO) reports that the number of men who smoke is falling. The findings demonstrate how government-led action can protect communities from tobacco, save lives and prevent people suffering tobacco-related harm, it says (https://www.who.int/publications-detail/who-global-report-on-trends-in-prevalence-of-tobacco-use-2000-2025-third-edition)
During the past two decades, …

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Prostate cancer overtakes breast cancer diagnoses

Prostate cancer has become the most commonly diagnosed cancer in England, provisional figures from Public Health England show.
There were 49 029 diagnoses of prostate cancer in 2019, 7828 more than in 2018. The disease has now overtaken breast cancer as the most commonly diagnosed cancer.
According …

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Aortic dissection diagnosis delay concerns

Nearly a fifth of patients with aortic dissection (AD) die before reaching hospital and half die before reaching a specialist centre, according to a report by the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (https://www.hsib.org.uk/investigations-cases/delayed-recognition-acute-aortic-dissection/final-report/).
The report on delayed recognition of acute AD was prompted by a case investigation …

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